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Morning Tutorials

Tutorial 1
Monday, July 11, 2022
8:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
UTK Conference Center – Room 400A
$285 ($150 Student)

Measurement and Characterisation of Metal Additive Surface Texture
Dr. Adam Thompson, Manufacturing Metrology Team, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, UK

In this course, we discuss the basics of measurement of metal additive surfaces using a variety of the contact and optical measurement systems employed across industry and academia. We will be taking a journey through the rationale and methods behind the ASTM Guide Additive Manufacturing of Metals – Powder Bed Fusion – Measurement and Characterization of Surface Texture that we have recent authors and is currently under review within ASTM prior to publication. Particularly, we will cover general concepts in metal additive surface texture measurement and characterisation and walk participants through the sample preparation steps required prior to measurement. We will then discuss good measurement practice across a wide array of contact and optical measurement instruments, and consider the traceability and calibration of these systems, including how to compare results acquired using different systems and technologies. We will conclude with a deep dive into characterisation of metal additive surfaces, looking at different filter selections, ISO protocols and appropriate means of reporting results.

The aim of this course is to gain an understanding of good practice in metal additive surface measurement while remaining instrument-agnostic and within ISO guidelines. After the course, attendees can expect to hold the basic knowledge required to perform metal AM surface measurement and characterisation.

Lecture 1: Background and Good Contact Surface Measurement practice (55 mins)
Lecture 2: Good Optical Surface Measurement Practice (55 mins)
Lecture 3: Traceability, Calibration and Comparison between Instruments (50 mins)
Lecture 4: Good Surface Characterisation Practice (50 mins)
Open Q & A (30 mins)

Tutorial 2
Monday, July 11, 2022
8:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
UTK Conference Center – Room 403
$285 ($150 Student)

Fracture and Fatigue Issues for (Metal) Additive Manufacturing
John J. Lewandowski – Arthur P Armington Professor of Engineering II and Director Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center (AMMRC), Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

The use of additive manufacturing to produce a variety of net shape components continues to capture the imagination of the community. There are a number of targeted non-structural applications that are either already in use or planned for insertion in the near future.  The talk will briefly cover some of these high-profile applications, followed by a presentation of recent works that are exploring the location- and orientation-dependence of mechanical properties in various builds and structures. Work at CWRU, and in collaboration with others, is examining the microstructure (e.g. morphology, crystallography, and defect density), surface roughness (machined, as-deposited), and mechanical behavior (e.g. tension, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth, high cycle fatigue) of both specimens and parts made with different AM machines.  In addition to printing and testing bulk samples, miniature samples have been excised from both bulk samples as well as prototype parts for both as-deposited and post-processed builds. Existing and evolving ASTM/ISO standards for additively manufactured materials were used to determine the orientation dependence of these mechanical properties. This work will illustrate the range of microstructural features and mechanical properties that are being reported for a few commonly studied alloy systems and AM techniques. Background into the various testing techniques (e.g. tension, toughness, fatigue) will be provided prior to discussion of research results. The opportunities and challenges facing the more widespread use of additive manufactured components in structural applications will be discussed.

Afternoon Tutorials

Tutorial 3
Monday, July 11, 2022
1:30 PM – 5:30 PM
UTK Conference Center – Room 400A
$285 ($150 Student)

An Introduction to Measurement Uncertainty and the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement
Dr. Adam Thompson, Manufacturing Metrology Team, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, UK

In this course, we will discuss the basics of measurement, covering why measurement is important and an abridged history of measurement. We will examine the concept of measurement traceability from fundamental principals and go through the global and legal infrastructure of measurement traceability. Following on from this, we will learn to understand the different types of error and means of calibration, and recap the international system of units by looking at their definitions, means of realization and dissemination. We will then spend the latter part of the tutorial consolidating our learning by going through the method of uncertainty evaluation presented in the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM), to understand the different stages of performing a GUM uncertainty evaluation. As part of this exercise, we will go through an extension worked example.

Lecture 1: The History and Principals of Measurement (55 mins)
Lecture 2: Errors, Calibration and the International System of Units (55 mins)
Lecture 3: Understanding the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (50 mins)
Lecture 4: GUM Worked Examples (50 mins)
Open Q & A (30 mins)

Tutorial 4
Monday, July 11, 2022
1:30 PM – 5:30 PM
UTK Conference Center – Room 403
$285 ($150 Student)

Topology Optimization for Additive Manufacturing
Dr. Fred van Keulen, Delft University of Technology

Additive manufacturing (AM) offers unprecedented design freedom. Moreover, structural complexity only midly influences the manufacturing costs. To fully benefit from AM, advanced structural designs should be realized. These designs should compromise between conflicting requirements, account for the physical aspects at hand and must ensure manufacturability. Topology optimization is a maturing computational technique which provides a perfect match with additive manufacturing. It can realize complex and competitive 3D designs perfectly suited for AM. As time progresses, topology optimization will gradually account for more physical and manufacturing related aspects.

The present tutorial provides an introduction to topology optimization. In this tutorial the main focus is on the so-called density approach. Topics addressed in the tutorial are as follows:

• Introduction to (structural) optimization
• General optimization problems
• Short overview of topology optimization formulations
• Design sensitivity analysis
• Compliance optimization
• Filtering techniques
• Extension to transient and nonlinear problems
• Accounting for (additive) manufacturing
• Examples
• Outlook

This tutorial intends to provide insight into topology optimization and its possibilities and limitations.