2018 ASPE and euspen Summer Topical Meeting

Advancing Precision in Additive Manufacturing

 

Sunday – Wednesday, July 22-25, 2018
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Berkeley, California, USA

Conference Co-chairs:
John S. Taylor, University of North Carolina – Charlotte
Richard K. Leach, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom

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Tutorials

Sunday, July 22, 2018
9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
Cost:  $0

Basics of Metrology
Richard Leach – Professor, Manufacturing Metrology Team, University of Nottingham, UK

Metrology is the science of measurement and its application. Knowledge of metrology is increasingly important for all types of advanced manufacturing including additive manufacturing in order to verify and qualify the manufacturing process and its outputs. As additive manufacturing processes mature and develop, from experimentation to production, they will need to align themselves with the needs and requirements specified within the traditional manufacturing domain and dimensional metrology, such as standardisation, measurement traceability and measurement uncertainty.

This tutorial will go through a brief history of metrology in order to build a foundation and explain the wider context behind metrology in general. From this the fundamental principles of measurement traceability will be explained along with other essential terminology and concepts. The metric system and its SI units and their realisations are covered. Lastly, basic dimensional metrology concepts and instruments will be presented.

Biography

Richard is currently a professor in metrology at the University of Nottingham and prior to this spent 25 years at the National Physical Laboratory. Richard’s research is dominated by what he calls “information-rich metrology”: the enhancement of manufacturing metrology through the use of a priori information, often utilising concepts from artificial intelligence. His current interests are the dimensional measurement of precision and additive manufactured structures. Richard is on the Council of the European Society of Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, the International Committee on Measurements and Instrumentation and several international standards committees. He is the European Editor-in-Chief for Precision Engineering. He has over 360 publications including five textbooks. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics, the Institution of Engineering & Technology, the International Society of Nanomanufacturing, the Institute of Measurement and Control and a Sustaining Member of the American Society of Precision Engineering. He is a visiting professor at Loughborough University and the Harbin Institute of Technology.


Sunday, July 22, 2018
8:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
Cost:  $250 Attendee; $125 Student

A tutorial on Fatigue Considerations for AM Components is being planned by the organizers.


Sunday, July 22, 2018
1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cost:  $250 Attendee; $125 Student

X-ray Computed Tomography for Dimensional Metrology
Adam Thompson – Researcher, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
Massimiliano Ferrucci – Research Engineer, Materialise, Leuven, Belgium
Evelina Ametova – Researcher, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Additive manufacturing (AM) has become known for its unique ability to produce complex structures, such as intricate lattices, and beautiful, organic, design optimised structures. These structures can allow for mass savings, impact energy absorption, vibration isolation, and thermal management; potentially revolutionising a number of industrial sectors.

However, these new structures throw up new metrological challenges, and are often not measurable by existing techniques. Particularly, internal and hard-to-access structures are common in AM parts, and conventional contact and optical surface measurement techniques are not capable of accessing the surfaces. Without measurement, parts cannot be verified, and cannot go into production.

In this tutorial, you will gain an insight into how X-ray computed tomography (XCT) can be used for dimensional measurements, particularly in relation to the measurement of AM parts. The history of XCT will be covered, and the pipeline for performing dimensional measurements will be explained. There will be discussions on the various metrological influence factors and how they can be compensated for, as well as on appropriate reference artefacts established in the XCT community. Additionally, surface measurement by XCT will be explained, with comparisons made between XCT data and conventionally measured data. Case studies will be presented and the limitations currently impeding XCT measurements will be discussed.

Biographies

Adam Thompson – Researcher, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
Adam received a Physics degree at the University of Warwick in 2013, before training as a teacher the following year. Following his teacher training, Adam chose to embark upon a PhD in additive manufacturing at the University of Nottingham, where he has been studying since then. During his PhD, Adam has helped to establish the use of X-ray computed tomography for the measurement of internal and hard-to-access surfaces, developing methods of surface extraction and data comparison.

Massimiliano Ferrucci – Research Engineer, Materialise, Leuven, Belgium
Massimiliano received a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Physics, and a Bachelor’s of Arts degree in Russian Language and Literature from the University of Maryland in 2007. From 2008 until 2013, Massimiliano worked as a physicist in the Dimensional Metrology Group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). During his employment at NIST, Massimiliano received a Master’s of Science degree in Applied Physics from the Johns Hopkins University. From 2013, Massimiliano worked on a PhD at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven) in the Faculty of Engineering Technology, developing methods to calibrate the geometry of X-ray computed tomography instruments. The first three years of doctoral research were performed at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the United Kingdom. Massimiliano is currently employed as a research engineer at Materialise NV, focusing on the development of XCT quality control methodologies for additively manufactured parts.

Evelina Ametova – Researcher, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Evelina Ametova received a Master’s of Science degree in Engineering Control from Tomsk Polytechnic University in 2012. For the following two years, she worked as a teaching assistant in the same university. Since 2014, Evelina has been pursuing a PhD degree in computed tomography at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. Her doctoral research is on modelling and compensation of geometrical misalignments in cone-beam X-ray computed tomography.


Sunday, July 22, 2018
1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cost:  $250 Attendee; $125 Student

Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing to Precision
Kevin Raedts – Senior Mechanical Designer, VDL ETG, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Gerrit Oosterhuis – System Architect, VDL ETG, Milpitas CA, USA

Metal additive manufacturing (AM) has earned its spot in the line of technologies that enable extreme capabilities in high-tech equipment. AM can be of great benefit for manufacturers of complex and high precision equipment. However, like any manufacturing technology, it comes with its own boundary conditions and limitations. Also, in general AM is more expensive than conventional machining, hence it should only be applied in cases where additional functionality represents sufficient added value.

So, to be able to reap the benefit of this technology, the designers need to understand these limitations, the according design rules as well as the main cost-benefit relations. Also, precision applications have their own challenging requirements in terms of precision, cleanliness and surface finish.

This tutorial will provide extensive insight into the process of metal AM using laser beam melting, which is currently the mainstream metal AM technology. Based upon this, design rules are taught as well as an understanding of how AM adds value to precision equipment. Finally, practical lessons learned from designing and post-processing metal AM parts in real-life use-cases will be presented. Also, there will be room in the tutorial for participants to bring their own case and have it analyzed/discussed during the tutorial.

Biographies

Kevin Raedts – Senior Mechanical Designer, VDL ETG, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Kevin received his MSC for electro mechanical engineering in 2005 at UC Leuven Limburg.  Following his graduation he worked as a mechanical engineer for companies like ASML , Thermo-Fisher, DAF and MAN. After gaining experience for several years in high precision engineering he joined Melotte in 2012  as an Additive manufacturing engineer. At Melotte he was responsible to design client specific solutions using additive manufacturing in combination with traditional post processing methods. In 2016 Kevin joined VDL ETG as a Senior mechanical engineer working on the ASML wafer handler project and joined the metal additive manufacturing program at VDL ETG.

Gerrit Oosterhuis – System Architect, VDL ETG, Milpitas CA, USA
After graduating for a PhD in Applied Physics at Eindhoven University, Gerrit has worked at the Dutch research institute  TNO on innovative additive manufacturing technologies and applications. Following this, Gerrit joined VDL ETG Eindhoven in 2013 where has been working as a system architect realizing dedicated wafer handling and milliKelvin temperature control equipment. In parallel has been heading the internal development program on metal Additive Manufacturing, where many customer projects have been done that prove the viability of metal AM for high-tech / semiconductor equipment.  Currently he is located in the USA providing local support to customers in the Silicon Valey area.

 

 

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